Ideas for the Party Human

Posts Tagged ‘Icebreakers

Animal Blindman’s Bluff (YC, C)–One child is blindfolded and stands in the center of the circle of players.  In his hand he holds a cane or plastic baseball bat.  The children dance around him till he taps on the floor, when they must stand still.  The Blindman then points his cane at some player, who takes the other end of the cane in his hand.  The Blindman commands the player to make a noise like some animal and then tries to guess who the player is.  If the guess is correct, they exchange places.  If not, the game continues, with the Blindman trying again with some other player.  The children may disguise their voices or their height.  With a large crowd, two or more Blindmen may be used at once.

 

 Apple-biting Contest (C, T, A)–Tie apples by the stems on strings attached to a heavy cord which is held high by posts (or whatever works).  Each contestant arranges his apple so that he can reach it with his mouth by standing on tiptoe.  At the signal to go, each player tries to get a bit of his apple.  Use of the hands is not allowed.  The first player to get three bites wins.

A variation is to use doughnuts instead of apples.  This time, the first player to get a bite wins.

Balloon Battle (T, A)–The guests are arranged in couples, and each girl has a blown-up balloon tied to her left ankle with a yard-long string.  The couples must keep their arms linked all during the game, the guy with the girl to his right.  Each man tries to protect his partner’s balloon while he, at the same time tries to step on and pop all of the others.  This goes on until only one couple’s balloon survives, and that couple wins the game.balloons

 Birthday Month Charades (T, A)–The group is organized by birthday months.  Those born in January get together, those in February, and so on.  Each group is given about 5 minutes to brainstorm and plan their pantomime.  When the time is up, each group in turn presents a pantomime of something about their month, such as the presentation of a Valentine for February, an Easter egg hunt for April, the signing of the Declaration of Independence for July, or the first Thanksgiving for November.  The groups not performing must watch and guess the month and the meaning of the charade being acted out.

Blind Postman (E)–One guest is blindfolded and stands in the center of a circle of chairs, as the Postman.  The leader (usually the host or hostess) is the Postmaster and has a list of cities which have been assigned to the players (who are seated on the chairs), one to each person.  The Postmaster calls the names of two cities, such as “Los Angeles to Houston.”  “Los Angeles” and “Houston” must immediately exchange seats while the Blind Postman tries to catch one of them or sit in a vacated chair.  The player who is caught becomes the Postman.  Players may crawl, run, walk, dodge or dive to escape the Postman, but they may not step outside the circle of chairs.  If the Postman seems to have trouble capturing someone, the leader may call four or five cities at a time, making it easier for someone to be caught.  When the Postmaster calls “Parcel Post!” all players must exchange seats.  Play continues as long as the Postmaster desires; a specified time limit is a good idea.  If the group is small, play until everyone has had a chance to be Postman.  It is possible to adapt the basic concept of this game to fit many party themes.

Careers (T, A)–Couples are formed, each couple draws from a box a slip of paper.  On the paper is written some occupation, and each couple must act out the profession given them.  The rest of the guests try to guess what it is.  For instance, a doctor might give his patient a physical, or an actor might play a scene from a well-known play or film.  Unlike charades, the couples may speak, but they must not say the name of the career or any derivative of it.

“Farmer in the Dell” (YC)–The children join hands and walk around in a circle, while the player chosen to be the Farmer stands in the center.  They sing the song, and when the lyrics indicate, he chooses a partner for a Wife.  Each player, in turn, selects another to represent the Child, the Nurse, the Dog, the Cat, the Rat, and the Cheese.  During the last verse, they all gather around the Cheese and clap their hands.  The Cheese becomes the Farmer for the next game.  The lyrics to the song are as follows:

1.         “The farmer in the dell, the farmer in the dell,children playing a game

Heigho! The derry-o! The farmer in the dell.”

2.         “The farmer takes a wife,” etc.

3.         “The wife takes a child,” etc.

4.         “The child takes a nurse,” etc.

5.         “The nurse takes a dog,” etc.

6.         “The dog takes a cat,” etc.

7.         “The cat takes a rat,” etc.

8.         “The rat takes the cheese,” etc.

9.         “The cheese stands alone,” etc.

Floating Feather (C, T, A)–Divide guests into groups of not more than eight.  The players join hands in a circle and try to keep a feather in the air by blowing.  They must not break hands.  The group which can keep the feather up longest wins.

Human Bingo (T, A)–Give everyone a sheet of paper divided into twenty squares.  Each player must get a signature of someone present in each square.  Meanwhile, the hostess writes down all the guests’ names on small slips of paper and places them in a hat.  When everyone is ready, she draws these names out one at a time.  When she called a guest’s name, that persons stands and turns around slowly, so everyone can get to know him and have a chance to check their bingo sheets for his name.  Each guests with that name on his sheet marks an “X” in that square.  When a player gets four X’s in a row, horizontally, vertically or diagonally, he shouts, “Bingo!”  He may be given a piece of candy or some other reward.  Continue until four or five players achieve Bingo.

Humility Contest (A)–Give each guest six ribbons of various colors, or something similar, to pin on their lapel.  No person is to say “I” for the rest of the evening.  If one guest catches another saying “I,” he or she may take one of that guest’s ribbons.  The one having the most ribbons at the end of the evening receives a prize for his or her contribution to the cause of humility.

Initials, Please! (T, A)–Give everyone a sheet of paper and a pencil.  Ask the guests to write down on the left-hand side of the paper a pre-determined word associated with the theme of the party.  On a signal, the players search for persons whose first or last names begin with one of the letters in the selected word.  When a player finds a person whose first or last name begins with one of the letters, he ask the person to sign his name to the right of the letter.  Although the person signs both his first and last name, he writes them in the order that they are needed.  The first player to find the people whose first or last names begin with the letters in the selected word reports to the leader, who then calls a halt to the game.  The leader reads the name appearing next to each letter, and asks the person whose name is read to raise his or her hand.  If the complete list is correct, the player wins the game.  If his list is incorrect, the leader calls for the person with the next highest number of names.  In the event that no ones first or last name begins with one of the letters in the word, everyone may write next to the missing letter, “Miss Nobody.”  Then the player with the most complete correct list wins the game.

“I’ve Got Your Number” (T, YA)–Give each guest a number which is to be pinned on them in plain sight and worn throughout the game.  Now give each player a list of instructions, such as the following:  “Introduce 5 to 2”; “Shake hands with 7 and 8”; “Find out the color of 10’s eyes”; “Ask 3 what he (or she) likes best for dessert”; “Ask 1 why good men (or women) are hard to find”; “Give 9 a ‘high five'”; etc.  It might simplify matters if you give only even numbers to men and odd numbers to ladies–or vice versa.

Marshmallow Race (C, T, YA)–Thread a large marshmallow to the middle of a string two feet long.  Two players take the ends of the string in their teeth.  At the signal to go, each player starts chewing the string.  The first one to get to the marshmallow wins.

Murder (T, YA)–Each guest is given a piece of paper which he must not show to the others.  He disposes of it after reading what is on it.  All but two slips of paper are blank.  Of the two, one reads “Murderer” and the other, “Detective.”  The Detective leaves the room, and the lights are turned out.  The players move around in the middle of the room until the murderer puts his hands on someone’s neck.  That person screams and falls to the floor.  The lights are turned on, and the Detective enters to question the guests.  Everyone must answer the questions truthfully, except the Murderer, who may lie if he wishes.  The Detective tries to discover who the Murderer is by interrogating the witnesses.

Number Call (T, A)–One player is designated as “It,” and the other guests are numbered.  “It” is blindfolded.  (Players may now change seats to confuse It.)  “It” calls from two to four numbers, and the guests with those numbers must change seats.  “It” tries either to tag a player or to get a vacated seat.  When the guests exchange seats, they move quietly, dodging as may be required to keep from being tagged.  If a guest is caught, he must take Its place, and the old It takes the number of the caught player.  The game proceeds as long as desired or until everyone has had a chance to be It.

Pass the Orange (T, YA)–Line up five to ten players on a side and give each side an orange of approximately the same size.  The race starts by each team having its first player place the orange under his chin, holding it there against his neck and chest.  From this time on, the hands must not touch the orange except to pick it up off the floor if it’s dropped.  He then passes the orange to the next player, who grabs it with her neck and chin in the same manner.  The first team to get the orange all the way through to the end wins.

Quick-Draw Relay (C, T, A)–Each of several groups chooses an artist and sends him to the leader.  This leader whispers to these representatives some item to draw, and they rush back to their groups to draw it.  As soon as an artist’s group guesses what’s being drawn, the members yell it.  The artist mustn’t give them any hint except by his drawing.  He may not write anything.  Each time, a new artist must be sent to the leader.  The first team to have each member complete a turn as artist wins.

Quiz ‘Em (T, A)–The hostess hands each guest a pencil and a handout.  Each person is asked to read the handout carefully and do as it directs.  Allow 10-15 minutes for this mixer.  The hostess then signals the end and asks all to be seated to check for the winner.  The player with the most complete list is the winner.  The handout may read something like this:

Please get the signature of the guests meeting the descriptions listed  below.  Get the name of a:

1.         Person born out of the state.                                       

2.         Person with initials that spell a word.                             

3.         Person who has a pet bird at home.                                  

4.         Person with a friendly smile.                                       

5.         Person whose last name could be a first name.                       

6.         Person with a hearty laugh.                                         

7.         Person who is left-handed.                                          

8.         Person wearing something brand new.                                 

9.         Person with dimples.                                                

10.       Person who plays a guitar.                                          

A variation of this game is to square the paper with four lines down and four across, making 16 squares.  Write a question within each square, leaving enough space at the bottom of each square for the signature.  Start everyone writing at the same time and the first person to get four in a row (like Bingo or Tic-Tac-Toe) is the winner.

Story Mix-up (C)–Take two short stories, like “The Little Red Hen” and “Little Red Riding Hood,” and copy them sentence by sentence on separate slips of paper, a sentence to a slip.  Mix them up in a bowl and then have each child draw a slip or two, according to the size of the group.  Indicate one player to begin the story by reading her first sentence.  The child to the right of the starter reads his first sentence, and so on it goes around the circle.

Ways to Get Partners (T, YA singles)–One way is to pass long strings through a large decoration which goes with the party theme–such as a heart for Valentine’s Day or a paper football for a Super Bowl party.  They should hang down evenly on either side.  The girls take hold of the ends on one side and the guys on the other.  At a signal they pull and locate their partners.

Another way partners may be formed is by matching valentines, numbers, split quotations, questions and answers, states and capitals, etc.–whatever fits the theme of the party.

Still another method is to write the names of composers, writers, artists or poets on one set of papers and the names of their musical numbers, books, artwork or poems on another set.  Distribute one set to the ladies and one to the men, if you are pairing in couples.  On a signal, the guests set out to match the names of the creators with the titles of their creations.  When the two meet, they become partners.

A more lively way of finding partners is the names of various common animals or birds on duplicate slips of paper (two of each animal or bird).  Give a slip of paper to each person, making sure that there are always two slips in circulation for each animal or bird.  On a signal, everyone begins searching for his or her partner by giving the characteristic call of the creature on his paper.  When two of the same kind meet, they are partners.

Who Am I? (T, A)–As the guests arrive, pin a slip of paper to each one’s back, making sure the person doesn’t see what is written on the paper.  Write the name of a famous person, whether contemporary, historical or scriptural.  As the guests move from person to person, they ask questions about the mystery person on their paper, trying to find out who it is.  As soon as a player is successful in guessing the name, he may remove the paper and sit down.  Other players try make their answers vague enough that the one asking won’t be able to sit down before they do.

One variation is to allow players to ask only those questions which can be answered by a “yes” or a “no,” or to ask only the question “What made this person famous?”.  You could have the people asked pantomime what made the person famous, instead of answering.  Another variation is to use names of well-known products, instead of famous people.

Zoo (E)–Peanuts, colored pieces of paper, candies or other things are hidden around the playing area.  Guests are divided into groups, and each group is given the name of some animal.  A keeper is designated for each group, and the players scatter to hunt for the hidden objects.  When a guests finds one, he cannot pick it up but must stand by it and make a sound like the animal he represents.  He continues this noise until the keeper for his group comes and picks up what has been found.  The game goes on until all the objects have been found or a specified time limit expires.  Then the keeper and group with the most items win.  This game can be adapted to fit many themes by changing the type of objects hidden, what or who the players are supposed to represent, and the kind of action they must do when they find the hidden treasures.

zoo animals


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